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More Detail on Hospitalizations in Younger Age Groups

By May 12, 2021Commentary

A reporter suggested to me that the increase in hospitalizations in younger age groups in Minnesota was supposedly occurring in ICU admissions.  DD kept working at this and you see in the charts below that this just isn’t true.  First, ICU use in these age groups is so low in absolute numbers that you couldn’t make any statistical statement.  Second, it hasn’t really changed.  General hospital use also has very low numbers in these groups, with a potential slight upturn in the absolute numbers for 20 to 29 year olds.  But the case rates haven’t changed.  The reality is that almost no ICUs in Minnesota have any young patients and the average hospital likely doesn’t have even one general admission of a young person.

Join the discussion 5 Comments

  • Dan Riser says:

    So they are lying or just blind to facts to keep agenda going.

  • J. Thomas says:

    Our friends at the CDC are about to sign off on a unanimous recommendation to jab teens. On what risk profile data was this decision based? Was this part of the deal with the Teacher’s unions?

  • J. Thomas says:

    Why doesn’t having had the virus count as a jab? Is T-Cell testing a viable option to get your ‘green’ card?

  • DuluthGuy says:

    Here’s another reason why I’m skeptical about the COVID vaccine. Despite the fact that the disease has something like a 99.998% recovery rate for those in good health under the age of 50, it’s also far from clear that the vaccine actually works. Here’s an article talking about 7 New York Yankees employees who had all been vaccinated all testing positive for COVID-19.

    https://www.outkick.com/all-seven-yankees-that-tested-positive-were-vaccinated/

    I’m very pro-vaccine in most cases, but am not going to get this vaccine myself nor will my kids get it. If I were 25 years older I may have considered getting it, but the chances of me dying or getting seriously ill from this disease are probably a lot less than dying in a car accident or struck by lightning. And while the vaccine may be safe, I’m not going to take the risk when the chances of actually getting sick from the virus are that low. And the chances of my kids getting sick from COVID-19 are lower than they are for me.

  • Kevin Roche says:

    I think that is a good question, since being infected seems pretty protective

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